Acupuncture as Natural Prevention for Illness

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Acupuncture as Natural Prevention for Illness

I had a job a while back where my boss actually sent us as landscapers to a acupuncturist clinic for preventative healthcare. The thinking and logic was that we should be treated on a continual basis to help us not get sick in the first place.

I loved the idea of prevention, because in this country, we have a view of health as something you pay attention to only when you get sick.

I know I only thought about it when I would get a cold, injury, etc when I was growing up.

Though I appreciated the proactive foresight, I was highly skeptical of "acupuncture". I thought it might be some silly thing that wealthy actors in Hollywood did to experiment and align their energy or whatever silliness they are always searching for in their fad treatments and programs.

What I experienced was anything but. 

I walked into a professional office, modern and decorated with oriental and peaceful elements. I got called to the back where I described the allergies I was having at the time, and various other areas I was experiencing pain. He also asked what I experienced stress from on a day to day basis which was far more thorough questioning than I experienced at a traditional Dr.

He had me lay down and I wasn't sure how I felt about the use of needles in this sort of experience but I was open-minded. 

He was examining me and I asked when he was applying the needles. He said "I already started". I was very surprised. He worked his way up my body and I watched as he slapped a hair-thin needle into different points up my body, even putting one into my forehead. 

It actually felt amazing. I barely felt the needle, and it gave me a relaxed and blissful feeling once it went in.

The only warning I have is not to bend your arms and legs when the needles are in. I made this mistake and he corrected me. That action did make that spot a bit sore for a little while. You have to lay completely still. He lit some essential oils, turned on some zen music, turned off the lights leaving on a black-light sort of lamp and layed a warm towel over my face. 

He left the room for an hour or so and I slipped into a dream-like state while still being awake and cognitive. It was pretty surreal. I always hated any semblance of a doctors office but this was something entirely different.

I left in a fantastic mood and went back to planting shrubs all day for work with the crew. 

The next day, my eyes, which had previously been itchy and swollen were completely normal and everyone commented on this. I was shocked at the difference.

Acupuncture in practice according to mayoclinic.org,

"is a discipline that involves the insertion of very thin needles through your skin at strategic points on your body. A key component of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture is most commonly used to treat pain. Increasingly, it is being used for overall wellness, including stress management."

The ancient Chinese pioneers of this technique describe it as balancing flows of energy as they flow through pathways (meridians) in the body. It is said that by inserting needles into points along these paths, the energy will become "unclogged" and re balance.

Probably more consistent with modern scientific understanding of the body, acupuncture points are places to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue. Some believe that this stimulation boosts your body's natural painkillers.

Acupuncture is claimed to help with many different types of pain, with stress, digestion, fatigue, nausea, circulation, headaches, and respiratory issues.

Acupuncture is something you only want to do through a trusted source. Here are some ways to find one.

-Ask around to people you trust for recommendations.
-Investigate the clinicians training and credentials. Most states require that nonphysician acupuncturists pass an exam conducted by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.
-Read third party online reviews and ask the practitioner questions about cost and effectiveness of the treatment for your condition.
-Ask your insurance if they cover the treatment.

 

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